Counting cash

Every Penny Counts

Every gift you send to Cambodian Communities out of Crisis goes to where it is needed — Cambodia. Our overheads are covered by Gift Aid and donations from Council members.

Please contact us if you would like a money box to collect your small change. Even the smallest gift helps.

Lawyers

Perseverance Pays Off

Back in January 2003, Cambodian Communities out of Crisis made the first of many sponsorship payments to support the education of a promising young Cambodian student, Mr Mong Sophy. Our donors’ generosity firstly enabled Sophy to obtain a certificate and a diploma in English at Cambodia’s premier English language school, the Australian Centre for Education. They then went on to sponsor him while he studied for a Bachelor of Law degree at Paññasastra University of Cambodia, which he obtained in 2012.

Since then, Sophy has been undertaking training with a law firm and this year he was admitted to the Cambodian Bar Association. He can now practise as a lawyer, but he has not finished his studies yet. After he has saved up some more money, he intends to study for a Master’s Degree in Law. Sophy’s ambition is to use the qualifications and skills he has obtained to help the poor, the disadvantaged and the dispossessed of Cambodia to obtain justice.

CCC is proud to have played a part in Sophy’s education. He remains committed to giving back to CCC as we move towards seeing our vision fulfilled for a Christian college and business institute where students like Sophy, unable to fund a high-quality education for themselves, can by perseverance and hard work achieve their potential.

Cambodian mother

A Stark Choice for Cambodia’s Surrogates

Babies born through surrogacy in Cambodia are in limbo after their birth mothers were accused of human trafficking. Who will take responsibility for them now?

Listen to The Documentary Podcast from the BBC World Service.

In a Cambodian hospital, a group of terrified new mothers nurse tiny babies under the watch of police guards. They’re surrogates, desperately poor women promised $10,000 to bear children for parents in China. But they were arrested under new anti-trafficking rules, and now they face an agonising choice: either they agree to keep children they didn’t want and can’t easily afford to bring up, children who aren’t genetically theirs, or they honour their surrogacy contracts and face up to 20 years in jail. Tim Whewell reports on the suffering as country after country in Asia cracks down on commercial surrogacy and asks whether Cambodia’s detained mothers are criminals or victims.

(Image: Former Cambodian surrogate Va-Tei: “I feel really sad that I had to give the baby away.” Credit: BBC)

Delegates at the forum

Faith Groups Join Forces to Combat Human Trafficking

The second Cambodia National Interfaith Forum on Combating Human Trafficking took place on 30 August 2018.

The event brought together government officials, leaders of different faith groups and non-governmental organisations working against trafficking. The forum was presided over by Samdech Kralahom Sar Kheng, Deputy Prime Minister of Cambodia, Minister of Interior and Chairman of the National Committee for Countering Trafficking.

The main purposes of the forum were threefold:

  • to raise awareness and knowledge of trafficking-related issues;
  • to promote broader engagement and participation of different faith groups, the general public and stakeholders to combat trafficking;
  • to advocate the government to observe the day as the “national interfaith prayer day against trafficking”.

CCC was represented at the event by Mission Co-ordinator Ms Huot Chanthoeun.